The Untimely Death of Mitchner McGarrulous

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Mitchner on the Rug

I Was Found

It was shortly after the untimely death of Mom’s orange polydactyl cat, Pawscar Awesome, in November 2016. She spotted one of the many Facebook postings for animals needing a home shared by Christine from the vet’s office. This courtesy post described a nine-year-old orange cat whose owner had died, leaving him in need of a home. That was me, Mitchner. The family had decided to keep the other two cats, whom they felt would be harder to place. Mom contacted the shelter that posted the ad and gave them her contact information. The owner’s daughter invited Mom to meet me. I guess Mom passed the test because I came home with her on December 3, 2016, and have become a much-loved part of her feline family. My full name was Mitchner McGarrulous.

 

 

I Was Friendly…Sometimes

Mom added the name McGarrulous because I was VERY talkative. When I first came to Mom’s home, I preferred to abide by myself in the kitchen, enjoying a variety of cat beds. Loneliness did not end up suiting me, though, because for a while I enjoyed joining several of the female felines in the bedroom, only returning to the kitchen briefly to play with my favorite cat toy. After some time, though, I started becoming aggressive toward Jenise. Mom thought I followed the very bad example of Rascal Spatz. To prevent conflicts while she was away, Mom decided I should stay in the kitchen. She did allow me to visit the bedroom in the evening…until I would get restless or nasty. It was probably just as well this way; I had inflammatory bowel disease and probably some food allergies, so I had to be on a special diet.

Mom made up a little ditty about me that she sang often:

Mitchner McGarrulous:

Life with him is perilous

‘Cause he’s got claws!

 

I Departed Too Soon

Shortly after I joined Mom’s feline family, I demonstrated some problems the vet identified as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I got a series of B12 shots and a special diet. Mom kept trying different foods that were created to help my problem, so I would keep eating. I did get a little tired of trips back and forth to the vet, though. Finally, it was decided that I should have a scan to determine what was happening on the inside. Unfortunately, it turned out that I probably had lymphoma. I was able to hang on a bit longer, but I finally stopped eating, and Mom was forced to say goodbye on June 10, 2020–truly, an untimely death!

 

 

Mitchner Moods

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Alarm

Mitchner McGarrulous rang my alarm bell with another bout with his IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). A trip to the vet revealed that he had lost nearly three pounds since his last visit. By itself, this would not necessarily be awful, since he was a rather chunky 14-pound-plus boy; however, there was not a deliberate weight loss effort. He had been switched to Science Diet z/d food since Dr. Katie discovered that he had allergies. Mitchner seemed to like this food at first, but over time he was less and less attracted to it. Bloodwork taken that day revealed that one of his kidney values is above normal, and the other is approaching the high end of normal. This is consistent with the increased water consumption I had noticed.

Alternatives

What to do? I searched online for other feline fare with hydrolyzed protein, and found alternatives by Purina and Royal Canin. I was able to order the Purina food without a vet prescription, so I did. Mitchner seems to like it somewhat better than he did the z/d dry. I then ordered some Royal Canin dry food and treats from Chewy, and my vet authorized the purchase. So far, Mitchner really likes the treats. I am hoping he will finish the Purina dry food before I start him on the Royal Canin. I also have started dosing him with 1/4 tablet of famotidine most days to see if that helps keep his stomach settled. Now he will eat some of the canned z/d chow that he had been rejecting, so maybe that is helping. Next step: I need to take him in for a urine test, but that will involve getting him to consume some gabapentin to relax him and cause him to cooperate with the vet.